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Piece of needlework serves as example of area’s distant past

A sampler (circa 1862) was sent to Annie Barger (Mrs. H. B. Dice by her father George Barger when George was a prisoner in Andersonville Prison during the Civil War. This sampler was made by a fellow prisoner. George was a soldier in the 11th Regiment, Company D, from Jersey Shore. George Barger is buried in the Old McElhattan Cemetery on the H.B. Dice plot. KAREN VIBERT-KENNEDY/Sun-Gazette

A sampler, made circa 1862, was sent to Annie Barger, who was married to H. B. Dice, by her father George Barger when he was a prisoner in Andersonville Prison during the Civil War. This sampler was made by a fellow prisoner. George was a soldier in the 11th Regiment, Company D, from Jersey Shore. George is buried in the Old McElhattan Cemetery on the H.B. Dice plot. The sampler is on display at the Jersey Shore Historical Society. Andersonville, in Georgia, held more prisoners at any given time than any of the other Confederate military prisons. It was built in early 1864 after Confederate officials decided to move the large number of federal prisoners in and around Richmond to a place of greater security and more abundant food. During the 14 months it existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here. Almost 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding or exposure to the elements. according to the American Battlefield Trust. A sampler, also called a needlework sampler, is a piece of embroidery or cross-stitching produced as a demonstration or a test of skill in needlework. These works often included the alphabet, figures (like the one shown at right), motifs, decorative borders and sometimes the name for the person who embroidered it and the date it was made. The word sampler is derived from the Latin exemplum, which mean ‘example’. These works of art were included in many civilizations throughout history.