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Information is worthless

June 21, 2013

In business, a recent paradigm shift has taken place best explained by a quote from Mr. Toyoda: The value of information is approaching zero. Today, information is cheap....

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(23)

CHayes

Jun-21-13 5:45 AM

The issue is what data is being collected. One thing that may be being collected is "email data". Many people confuse "email data" with the content of email. It is not. It's actually email metadata. It's "From", "To", and possibly "Subject" data. It is essentially the data that would appear on the outside of an envelope, rather than it's contents. The gov't requires a warrant to read the contents of an email you send. If you have a Gmail acct, Google has software that actually examines the content of your email to tailor ads to things you may be interested in. Facebook does the same thing with information you post, and look at on FB.

The same thing is true of metadata on phone calls (from, to, and location). If you have a smartphone with apps on it, this same data is being harvested daily, but also possibly your age, and other information. That data is sent to companies that design apps, and then even possibly sold to advertising com

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CHayes

Jun-21-13 5:52 AM

If you go online on your computer, and you have your browser set to accept cookies (if you don't need to sign in every time you come to this website, your browser is set to accept cookies), your every move online is being tracked by large companies that sell data about your every movement online. What sites you go to. How long you stay on each site. What site you go to after visiting a particular site. Literally your every move. One of the largest companies that does this is located in Clearfield. This is a major way the internet is "monetized" and paid for.

The point of this all is, people are creeped out about the recent revelations about the NSA, because it violates some imaginary sense of "privacy" people felt they had a few weeks ago, but that privacy was just a fantasy. You don't have any privacy online, and haven't had any for years. Not without taking exceptional measures.

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ToTEXASfromPA

Jun-21-13 6:01 AM

"So, how do we set limits and enforce them?"

++

I guess one of the things you need to do is just be legal in all your actions.

Even if the government sets limits, one of these days hackers will break-in and download your data anyways.

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idiottwo

Jun-21-13 6:05 AM

is the new paridym predicting? Predicting when the knob for the washer is need and where YOU (specifically)should get it? Maybe with information and blended knowledge of medical (your breath for example, unique to an individual, but reflecting current situations) improve predicting to a level close to exactness.

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MrShaman

Jun-21-13 6:20 AM

"The government is now collecting massive amounts of information.

The question that needs to be asked is: How can that information be used?

It can rightly be used to prevent or solve crimes. It can wrongly be used to expose a citizen's sexual orientation or divorce records. So, how do we set limits and enforce them?" - Erik Latranyi

*

Set limits???? Shouldn't that have been discussed when The Originals (Madison Avenue) first "entered" our homes, thru the "magic" of T.V.???

More-recently (relatively speaking), everyone's "personal"-info was mined...and, we were sold on the ideas of buying bottled-WATER and canonizing everyone who works on Wall Street (and, within the banking-industry).

The government can only HOPE to do as well as The Marketplace...when it comes to gathering our "personal"-data...but, my money is still on The Marketplace (especially during political-campaigns).

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MrShaman

Jun-21-13 6:24 AM

"The more that's out there about you, the greater the chance it can be used to hurt you." - Francine

*

...Or, "sell" to you!! Just ask the folks at The-Axis-Of-Ignorance (FAUX Noise/Porky Limbaugh/NY Post).

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MrShaman

Jun-21-13 6:30 AM

"If you have a Gmail acct, Google has software that actually examines the content of your email to tailor ads to things you may be interested in. Facebook does the same thing with information you post, and look at on FB.

The same thing is true of metadata on phone calls (from, to, and location). If you have a smartphone with apps on it, this same data is being harvested daily, but also possibly your age, and other information. That data is sent to companies that design apps, and then even possibly sold to advertising com." - CHayes

*

Exactly!!!!

Who can POSSIBLY forget one o' the most-successful efforts to "mine" personal-data; i.e. "(Whichever Democrat, here) IS TRYING TO TAKE YOUR GUNS FROM YOU!!"

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eriklatranyi

Jun-21-13 8:23 AM

I did not have room for examples.

suppose you had only the metadata for phones. You notice that phone A is calling a known prostitute on phone B.

You know the calls are lasting 15 minutes and repeat every Friday night.

An employee of a gov't contractor matches phone A to a man running for political office as a conservative, deeply religious man.

This employee leaks the information to the opposing campaign. Commercials run, the media spews and the candidate is destroyed.

---continued---

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eriklatranyi

Jun-21-13 8:27 AM

---continued---

It turns out that phone A was asked by a friend to help intervene with his daughter's prostitution. Phone A knows that if he can talk her down before the weekend, she will not turn tricks and do drugs.

The metadata was used to destroy a good man.

The same could happen to a liberal trying to help a pedophile resist his temptations.

The bottom line: Data can be true, but misused.

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CMReeder

Jun-21-13 8:31 AM

It is not just the government who is collecting information about us. Financial institutions, consumer institutions, medical instituions, education intitutions, military institutions; name any organization and institution in our society and they collect information on us and they sell that information to others, your information.

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spike2

Jun-21-13 9:53 AM

Erik - your examples are interesting. Who is going to care if someone is contacting a prostitute on Friday? If one of the parties is charged criminally the information is readily available through a subpoena for phone records. This has been for years. Prostitution is currently a crime as is hiring a prostitute. Contractor and religious official, someone knows without phone records. Divorce is a matter of public record. You can go to the Prothonotary office and read any ongoing civil proceeding or resolved cases going back decades. If not in hard copy is still on micro. I'm not sure why a liberal would be counseling a pedophile. You lost me there other than associating liberal with horrible person and others examples as "innocent victims". BTW, a true pedophile will never call for help because the see nothing wrong with the aberrant behavior. There are several internet sites offering "help" apparently. I just Googled but that may be because the believe it provides

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eriklatranyi

Jun-21-13 10:01 AM

Spike:

I did not mean to imply a liberal equals bad person. I wanted to give a parallel example to the one about the conservative counseling a prostitute.

The crux of my argument is that the metadata can paint a picture, but not all the facts.

Divorce records are typically sealed. Obama won his Illinois Senate seat when the divorce records of his opponent were "leaked" and showed an accusation of spousal abuse, sinking his candidacy.

You know that in a difficult divorce, accusations are thrown about frequently.

I am not accusing Obama of this as it could have been someone sympathetic to his campaign that created the leak.

It is an illustration of how such data can be used to destroy good people of any ideology.

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eriklatranyi

Jun-21-13 10:03 AM

..and as we now know, the information collected is being shared with contractors and many who have no expectation of trust.

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CitizenX

Jun-21-13 10:20 AM

Erik, I understand exactly what you are saying and your example of the daughter into prostitution is a good one. And I agree with basically everything.

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CHayes

Jun-21-13 11:52 AM

" suppose you had only the metadata for phones. You notice that phone A is calling a known prostitute on phone B..."

Are you actually arguing for the concealability of crime? Kind of a strange position to take.

" It turns out that phone A was asked by a friend to help intervene with his daughter's prostitution. Phone A knows that if he can talk her down before the weekend, she will not turn tricks and do drugs.

The metadata was used to destroy a good man."

You forgot the part whete the candidates mouth us duct taped shut, so he can't defend himself.

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CHayes

Jun-21-13 11:59 AM

" ..and as we now know, the information collected is being shared with contractors and many who have no expectation of trust."

So now you're saying you're against private govt contractors? Were you asleep during the Bush administration when jobs previously done by govt employees were being handed of to low paid private contractors at an astronomical pace?

Incidentally, privacy rules that apply to govt employees also apply to govt contractors, but I certainly agree they should be replaced by actual govt employees where possible.

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CHayes

Jun-21-13 12:05 PM

Any discussion of privacy, as it relates to the allegations of the traitor needs to start with two questions:

Do you have your browser set to accept cookies, and maintain your browsing history?

and

Do you have apps on your smartphone?

If you answer yes to either question, your phone and browsing metadata are already being harvested, so you can't be too concerned about privacy.

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CHayes

Jun-21-13 2:28 PM

This isn't about hacking boobie. Your data online data has been harvested by private companies almost aslong as there has been an internet. That's one of the primary things cookies were designed for. People can look at every site you go to, how long you spend there, and where you go next. And unlike the govt, they actually care what you're looking at online.

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CHayes

Jun-21-13 2:34 PM

Apps on smartphones can also coral and transmit all kinds of data about you, from call data, to your location, even your age. That's been going on almost as long as there have been independently developed smartphone apps.

There have even been apps put on the Android market that were designed to steal your credit card info. That's more into the malware sphere, but rest assured, that apps you have on your smartphone are vacuuming up routine info about you and your movements, and sharing that data with third parties.

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spike2

Jun-21-13 3:46 PM

Erik - as to testimony and so forth in a divorce unless transcripts are requested. Divorce is a civil proceeding. What is the basis for sealing Orders and Decrees? Go look up someone you know who had a divorce that is final. You will see what is public information. The file is accessible by simply looking up the docket, pulling the file and reading. Bobbie - end of the world. We agree.

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USABorn

Jun-21-13 6:09 PM

MrShaman - 6:24 AM

"Or, "sell" to you!! Just ask the folks at The-Axis-Of-Ignorance (FAUX Noise/Porky Limbaugh/NY Post)."

Sham is off his meds, as usual.

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

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CHayes

Jun-22-13 2:16 PM

Don't you mean "Bushphones" boobie? Your boy Gorge W started giving out free cell phones. Isn't that why you voted for him twice? Because you wanted your freebies?

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spike2

Jun-22-13 3:35 PM

Bobbie, you must live in one crappy area. Haven't seen anyone passing out Obama phones on my street, nor a Good Humor Man.

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