Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Newspaper contacts | All Access E-Edition | Home RSS
 
 
 

Tragic

June 23, 2013

It is tragic that whistleblower Edward Snowden may have to be a fugitive for the rest of his life, when all he did was expose the fact that our government is breaking the la....

« Back to Article

 
 
sort: oldest | newest

Comments

(20)

GysgtUSMC

Jun-24-13 6:50 AM

Do those that support this also feel it would be ok for the government to retrieve your GPS data? If not, why?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

GysgtUSMC

Jun-24-13 6:46 AM

Why do the police need a warrant to retrieve phone records from a carrier? According to some they shouldn't need one. My question is, where does this all end and what right does our government have retrieving this same data from innocent citizens from foreign countries?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 6:01 PM

" Just ask former Gen Petraeus and Allen"

Ah yes boobie, there's that central theme of the Republican party again- personal responsibility is always for the other guy.

0 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 4:47 PM

" If the government becomes unhappy with you at some point in the future, they can go back and look at everything you've done on your computer since about 2006 and may have some information back to the 1990's."

If you're that paranoid, then please explain what device you used to put up your post on this message board.

I rest my case.

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

enigma

Jun-23-13 4:36 PM

CHayes,"Absolutely wrong. It WOULD be illegal if the govt were actually listening to the content of American's phone calls, or reading the content of their email without a warrant, you know, like was being done about 10 years ago."

This is the same program and it's been much more than 10 years. government computers read every e-mail and listen to every phone call. If yours is flagged then it is listened to by a person, WITHOUT A WARRANT. If they find something then they go get a warrant. That's illegal, but it's even worse than that. Even if your communications aren't flagged by the computers, they are saved in a giant database. If the government becomes unhappy with you at some point in the future, they can go back and look at everything you've done on your computer since about 2006 and may have some information back to the 1990's. The government gathering this information without a warrant is unconstitutional. A warrant after the fact does not make it better.

3 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 1:29 PM

"The NSA spying is illegal and is known to be illegal by those in Congress who support it. "

Absolutely wrong. It WOULD be illegal if the govt were actually listening to the content of American's phone calls, or reading the content of their email without a warrant, you know, like was being done about 10 years ago.

Not the case now.

0 Agrees | 3 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 1:26 PM

The new right wing hero seems to be missing a couple stops on his freedom tour. Obviously he started with China, now he's moving on to Russia, Cuba, and Venezuela. Strikes me that maybe he's shopping the classified data he stole around.

I think he forgot a couple places though. Why how will Iran, and North Korea feel about being left out? I can understand him skipping Chechnya, there's not enough money there, but he must be hurting the feelings of the Iranians and North Koreans.

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

enigma

Jun-23-13 1:25 PM

I never agree with Dr.Vosk, until now. It is refreshing to see someone who recognizes a violation of the Constitution, even when it's their own guy doing it. This is not part of the Patriot Act (which was unconstitutional under Bush, and was extended and expanded under Obama). The NSA spying is illegal and is known to be illegal by those in Congress who support it. That's why there is no legislation authorizing it. They have authorized billions of our dollars to spy on us, but never specifically authorized the activity. They are happy to have you confuse the NSA spying with the phone records scandal. Both are violations of the Fourth Amendment, but the phone records scandal has the illusion of being legal. The NSA spying program is worse than anything ever done in Nazi Germany or the Soviet Union at its worst. It is not necessary to keep us safe and actually hinders detection of terrorists by collecting too much data. Many resources are wasted collecting and storing all of that data.

4 Agrees | 3 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 1:13 PM

"Companies hold all sorts of information on citizens. But they must also hold that information private."

Sure, until someone produces a COURT ORDER, like in the case in question. A court order trumps a privacy policy every time. We live in a nation of laws erik.

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 1:11 PM

"First, I do not have to include a return address, so nobody should know who sent the letter."

So you are telling us that you're so paranoid, that you don't put a return address on letters, but you put your real photo, employer, hometown and place of residence, likes, etc. on Facebook where ANYONE can view it because you don't engage even the most basic privacy protection that Facebook offers for free?

You're making less and less sense erik.

"All the information that you claim we put out there is provided on the basis that it is held in confidence"

You don't even understand what information you're talking about. You STILL have been unable to indicate that you have even the foggiest idea what "metadata" even is.

And again, is your browser set to accept or reject cookies? If you accept cookies on your browser, then you are indicating that you don't care who tracks your every movement on the internet.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 1:05 PM

"Actually, I believe that a Sealed Indictment exists."

And the indictment is undoubtedly sealed because it contains references to stolen classified data.

0 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 1:04 PM

"It's illegal and I believe it's Obama who's authorizing it."

In what world is the NSA capturing phone and email metadata illegal? Ever hear of the Patriot Act?

NOTHING that the govt has done is alleged to be illegal.

0 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

spike2

Jun-23-13 11:21 AM

Actually, I believe that a Sealed Indictment exists.

2 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CMReeder

Jun-23-13 8:58 AM

Snowden is a fugitive because he ran and he will continue to be so unbtil he is either caught or returns to authorites for questioning.

3 Agrees | 3 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CMReeder

Jun-23-13 8:24 AM

Apparently people do not understand what the Patriot Act allows the government to do. The government did in fact have a warrant to data mine and the cooperation of corporations who deal with communications.

5 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

spike2

Jun-23-13 8:10 AM

Update folks: "The Hong Kong government announced on Sunday afternoon that it had allowed the departure from the territory of Edward J. Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who has acknowledged disclosing classified documents about United States government surveillance of Internet and telephone communications around the world. A Moscow-based reservations agent at Aeroflot, Russia’s national airline, said that Mr. Snowden was aboard flight SU213 to Moscow, with a scheduled arrival there a little after 5 p.m. Moscow time. The reservations agent said that Mr. Snowden was traveling on a one-way ticket to Moscow"

4 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

spike2

Jun-23-13 8:07 AM

How many of you ever looked in your spouses wallet or cell phone? Kerstetter, your house level is fairly extreme, but probable cause has been created for years. How many illegal search and seizures do you think occur on a daily basis. How many unneeded stop and frisks? Everyone focused on other issues and let the 4th amendment be disseminated. Everyone was ok with this until it hit your own backyard.If it helped catch criminals, well, you aren't a criminal. Now that this has come home to you, just like a minority on any street, instant outrage. Got to love it. Fine for someone else but not me. Great job folks.

4 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

eriklatranyi

Jun-23-13 7:19 AM

CHayes:

You keep using the envelope example.

First, I do not have to include a return address, so nobody should know who sent the letter.

Second, the gov't has never created a database of what is on the outside of envelopes, like they are doing now.

So, your example falls very flat on every front.

Companies hold all sorts of information on citizens. But they must also hold that information private. That is why they have privacy agreements and assure you that the data is only used for marketing purposes.

When a breech occurs, penalties are imposed and fines take place. Banks have paid for years of credit monitoring when they have a breech of security.

All the information that you claim we put out there is provided on the basis that it is held in confidence.

4 Agrees | 4 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

mikekerstetter

Jun-23-13 5:47 AM

Sure it is Chris. It's the equivalent of searching your house when no one is looking to see if there is a reason that they should get a search warrant to search your house. It's illegal and I believe it's Obama who's authorizing it.

9 Agrees | 5 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

CHayes

Jun-23-13 2:47 AM

"Collecting private data on millions of people who have never remotely been suspected or accused of criminal activity is a clear violation of the Constitutional requirement for "probable cause.""

Sorry Arno, but the data isn't really that private. It isn't really any more private than the addresses on an envelope that you take and hand to a govt employee at the Post Office.

The data in question allows the govt to see if there is in fact probable cause to request a warrant, that would allow them to look at actual private data (the content of communications).

2 Agrees | 10 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Showing 20 of 20 comments
 
 

Post a Comment

You must first login before you can comment.

*Your email address:
*Password:
Remember my email address.
or
 
 

 

I am looking for:
in:
News, Blogs & Events Web