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Heroin rehab

January 24, 2014

I am a little confused that the welfare office is paying for recipients to go to rehabilitation for heroin for a 28 day period or so....

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(39)

rmiller

Jan-26-14 12:56 PM

Ahhhh, the topic of addiction/reformation/rehabilitation...gotta love the victim mindset of the progressive left.

No one puts a gun to your head to participate in one form of substance abuse (to include alcohol). That being said, no one should have to contribute to your clean up after the fact. If coming off ****** kills you (and much argument speaks against that happening) then dying was more important than living, period.

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BillTriumph

Jan-26-14 8:17 AM

Apparently we can almost end dependence, addictions, and crime by legalizing marijuana. Marijuana as the philosophers stone. Forget about your stupid lead. Chrysopoeia realized: Weed to Gold.

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MrShaman

Jan-25-14 9:36 AM

"Stocks in the public square are way cheaper than long term incarnation. Skip the trial and let the mob rule and think of the savings to the taxpayer." - JerryfromRI

*

Yeah...we could call it a "states' rights" issue, again!!!!

See:

Musarium: Without Sanctuary

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JerryfromRI

Jan-25-14 7:35 AM

Stocks in the public square are way cheaper than long term incarnation. Skip the trial and let the mob rule and think of the savings to the taxpayer. Lastly, everyone knows that only poor people use illegal drugs,

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MrShaman

Jan-25-14 5:57 AM

It's looking like the 21st Century might be coming to PA!!

*

See:

PA Bill To Legalize Medical Marijuana Named After Former Republican Governor

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MrShaman

Jan-25-14 5:46 AM

Shaman...no one said anything about making things magical. But incarceration, imo, severs the line between an addict and the ability to continue to feed that addiction. -Wwhickok

"This is a common misconception. The availability of illegal drugs in our prison system has been an ongoing problem." - Capricorn1

*

BINGO!!!!! People, in prisons, still manage to recognize the value of capitali$m.

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802ParkAve1974everythingtonothingtoeverything

Jan-24-14 9:25 PM

And I'm not talking about all drugs. But Marijuana and Hero users are not prone to violence. Not true of stimulants like coke or methan. They foster violent behavior. They should never be legalized.

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802ParkAve1974everythingtonothingtoeverything

Jan-24-14 9:19 PM

Legalization with state run distribution makes so much sense.

The entire country of Portugal went that way, and the crime rates in Lisbon has plummeted. There has also been no significant change in the countries GNP, but quite a positive improvement in the country's budget.

It costs the country much less in law enforcement and prison space.

But, we won't do that here. We'd rather create a war that can not be won, and create criminals that can not be housed.

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Capricorn1

Jan-24-14 7:08 PM

Shaman...no one said anything about making things magical. But incarceration, imo, severs the line between an addict and the ability to continue to feed that addiction. -Wwhickok

This is a common misconception. The availability of illegal drugs in our prison system has been an ongoing problem. Those addicted are just as desperate behind bars as they are on the streets and they go to great lengths to get the drugs inside. Whether it be through corrupt CO's or smuggling them in through many other channels, they have nothing but time and inmates with years of experience beating the system.

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underwood

Jan-24-14 3:28 PM

The company I retired from had a policy to provide rehab for substance abusers one time. If that rehab wasn’t successful, the individual was terminated. How we could apply something like that to our H problem is what we should be discussing.

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underwood

Jan-24-14 3:22 PM

Cap is correct in that a user has to reach his or her personal bottom before treatment will be successful according to training I received. That bottom will vary considerably from person to person, so there’s no one size fits all solution. The bottom line is that allowing oneself to become addicted and seeking help to cure that addiction are both personal choices.

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sideliner

Jan-24-14 1:51 PM

Kim, that was no threat, personal or otherwise to you. Just a direct question asking which you would prefer. You do this, you get that.

Denying food,health insurance, and other benefits is denying treatment. Addiction is all encompassing and all areas must be addressed. There aren't enough rehab beds for every addict in this city. While waiting, they may go to AA/NA, individual and group counseling, Drug/DUI/MH court, etc.

The get tough and lock em up with no luxuries mentality cut all kinds of warm and fuzzy programs prisoners had. Like education,D&A treatment,vocational training,even in-house jobs got cut. Tough on crime legislators wanted them locked up doing nothing and nothing is what they are doing. The problem is, they aren’t doing life. They get out and move in next door to you and me.

Incarceration on its own does not work. We lead the free world in #’s in prison yet have an unbelievably high crime rate as well that prove that point.

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NLSLH10

Jan-24-14 1:26 PM

If the welfare office, or most commonly the local D&A Commission, do not fund ppl struggling with addiction to attend tx centers then you will see an increase in crime. You ask how they afford to spend countless dollars on their drugs. Well the answer is they don't. Ppl will go to all means to obtain monies to fund there addiction. So I don't know about you but I would rather spend money on treatment for these individual than to have an increase in crime, prostitution, children suffering and so on. I think instead of being angry about people getting money to help better their lives you should be looking toward a solution not a problem. Taking away peoples food stamps or insurance or any funds that help stabilize those in need is not going to do anything but create a perpetuating cycle and cause ppl to "do what it takes" Also rehab is only the beginning phase of tx it is designed to remove ppl from situations to detox and then they are set up with longer term therapies

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johnnyad3

Jan-24-14 1:24 PM

What is "successful completion of rehab"? From what I understand, once your hooked on something, whether it be alcohol, h3 roin, etc., you are always hooked. And with meth, he roin, or crack, it is that much more intense an addiction.

PA DOC says it costs $35K per year per inmate; $15K more that what it costs to go to Penn State with room and board. As with anything, it seems to me that we are always in a knee jerk reaction mode. Is there ever a long range thought out plan to tackle some of our issues?

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wwhickok

Jan-24-14 12:49 PM

Perhaps upon being released prior to the end of their rehabilitation, the proper alternative, instead of being released into a half-way house or w/e, would be to be admitted to a rehab (without choice) to complete the remainder of your rehabilitation. The successful completion of that rehabilation is, I would think, very important. The key word is "successful". An completion that doesn't keep an addict from returning to drugs is not, imo, a successful rehabilitation.

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wwhickok

Jan-24-14 12:46 PM

Shaman...no one said anything about making things magical. But incarceration, imo, severs the line between an addict and the ability to continue to feed that addiction. However, that also strengthens the importance of rehab while incarcerated. If these people aren't rehabilitated and aren't "cleaned up" while in prison, what is to stop them from going right back to their addiction? Nothing at all, that's what, imo.

I don't know from personal experience of having actually gone through it myself. However, I do know about the effects it has on families being the son of a man who was incarcerated for narcotics (a long time ago). Rehabilitation matters.

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farmer

Jan-24-14 12:26 PM

Deny treatment and maybe your house will get hit." sideliner

So, either we give them our money or else? I love to be threatened into liberal programs. eriklatranyi

Eric, you have used this line before, but these are not "threats". In this case Sideliner is just stating cause and effect. For instance; if you say your going to jump off a bridge and I tell you, don't do it or you'll break your head on those rocks. I'm not threatening you, I'm just telling you what is going to happen. ****** users steal for their fix. If they don't get help with their addiction, they will continue to steal. There is no liberal or conservative bent here. It's just what is going to happen. Cause and effect.

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CMReeder

Jan-24-14 11:39 AM

The problem is they don't fund it. Those who oppose doing so say that it doesn't work and is costly.

It cost way more to incarcerate offenders than it is to treat drug addiction. The treatment of addiction is also viewed as a social program.

Those in drug addiction treatment are in fact tested on a regular basis. It is a violation of parole also to test positive.

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Steelman

Jan-24-14 10:39 AM

“I say cut them off so they are desperate enough to seek treatment, otherwise we just keep breeding druggies.”…..Pinecr Unfortunately they don’t seek treatment. They still are seeking the high, so you breed thieves and prostitutes instead of clean and sober.

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pinecr

Jan-24-14 10:14 AM

so sideliner...your thinking is continue to give them money to buy drugs...I say cut them off so they are desperate enough to seek treatment, otherwise we just keep breeding druggies.

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Capricorn1

Jan-24-14 10:07 AM

What happens to them when they are released before the end of treatment? Either it is government's role to help in the treatment of drug addiction or it isn't. Only in this case but not that one unless you get sent to prison. -Reeder

Chuck, follow on care should be a condition of their parole. As far as picking and choosing who gets care, I'm only addressing those incarcerated because government has the perfect opportunity to address the mental and substance abuse issues at that time. Start off taking care of those in the system to attempt to keep them from reoffending. Figures go as high as 85% recidivism in this country. Rehabilitation should be included along with punishment. Currently that policy only applies in our system for juveniles.

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MrShaman

Jan-24-14 9:29 AM

"Asylums were used to treat not just those with clear mental disorders, but also those who refused, or repeatedly failed, substance treatment." - eriklatranyi

*

...Not to mention those "errant" wives, whose husbands "treated" them to a little "time-out"...back, when that was an acceptable-option...and, the dude had the buck$ to get the job done.

*

See:

Laurelton State Village - Asylum Projects

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CMReeder

Jan-24-14 9:18 AM

What happens to them when they are released before the end of treatment? Either it is government's role to help in the treatment of drug addiction or it isn't. Only in this case but not that one unless you get sent to prison.

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Capricorn1

Jan-24-14 9:02 AM

For the 28 day treatment in the letter, when funds are slashed you give as much treatment as you can to as many as you can with the funds you have. That applies equally to prison treatment programs as well. You know the line, 'People are to help themselves not the government's role to help them'. -Reeder

We've spent hundreds of billions of dollars on drug interdiction, but very little money and resources fighting the other end of the snake; addiction. And as far as government's role, when it comes to those incarcerated, they are under the direct care and responsibility of government and government should use whatever resources necessary to combat addiction at that stage to reduce the chances that these people will commit further crimes against society.

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Capricorn1

Jan-24-14 8:52 AM

That's what "they say", huh...that, a little time (in the "can"), "magically" eliminates any-and-ALL emotional-turmoil that DRIVES people to self-medicate with H, huh???? -Shaman

I agree and that's why I pointed out in my earlier post that treatment for mental health issues is also lacking in our prison system and mental health goes hand in hand with abuse. As long as we are releasing these inmates without any type of treatment, we will never drive down the recidivism rate.

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