×

Factory Works Gallery to debut ‘GIANTSIZED’ exhibit

The Factory Works Gallery at the Pajama Factory is inviting area art lovers to something really big with “GIANTSIZED: The Penultimate Exhibition of Brian James Spies,” which will be on display Nov. 1-21.

For the past two and a half years, area artist Brian Spies has acted as the director and curator of the Factory Works Gallery, and after this December’s pop-up Holiday Market Cash N Carry Show, he will be retiring from that position. With that in mind, he has decided to go out with a show that reflects his 6-foot-8-inch stature.

The exhibition will feature work by a selection of Pajama Factory artists who are all working larger than life. From Chad Andrews’ large silicon drawings to Tommy Grieco’s giant explosions of color pastel drawings and Dai En’s sculptural installations that evoke imagined natural phenomenon, the works all address the largeness that Spies himself embodies.

The “GIANTSIZED” show will be the last for Spies, who is stepping down from his position as Factory Works Gallery director.

“This is my last show as director of Factory Works Gallery, not including the holiday market pop up show in December, so I wanted to go out with something BIG!” he said. “The art in this show is befitting of my personality and physical stature and I’m really excited about seeing it all come together. I’m really proud of the shows I’ve put together the past two and a half years and this one’s no different!”

In addition to Spies, “GIANTSIZED” will also feature artists Chad Andrews, Joanne Landis, Tommy Grieco, John McKaig, Dai En, Steven Getz, Marsha Turner Pluhar, Dave Stabley, Deb Stabley, Carol Ann Simon Cillo, Paul Derr, Todd Rice, Steve Bower and Rita Bower.

An opening reception will be held November 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. While there, visitors to the Gallery can also check out Lycoming College student Krista Brady’s exhibition, “Behind Closed Doors,” in The Lobby 7 Gallery Space. “Behind Closed Doors” is a body of work addressing themes of mental illness. Brady’s exhibition will be on display until November 18, during normal business hours.

As a psychology major at Lycoming College with a passion for art, Brady wants to represent mental health through the work that she creates. As a local, she has seen just how much of an impact mental illness has had on her small town of Williamsport.

“During my high school career, four students died by suicide, including one of my closest friends,” she said. “The opening of the show is on November 1st, which marks the third-year anniversary of my friend’s death, as well as the death of that friend’s boyfriend.”

The opening of the show is a night to honor her friend and make sure that she is never forgotten.

“It is to show the significance of time and healing, and how I used art as an outlet to cope through the healing process,” she said.

“Behind Closed Doors” depicts the aspects of mental illness that people do not discuss openly in public. The pieces focus mainly on depression, anxiety, suicide, and the hope that it gets better.

“Another underlying theme of this show is to spread kindness and be a friend to someone, because everyone is fighting their own battle(s) that they do not discuss,” Brady said. “Through my work I hope to show the importance of mental health, to support those that are still fighting, and to honor the ones that have lost their fight.”

COMMENTS