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Verdict split for city man accused of assault

Arthur W. Reed, 47, was found guilty by jury of simple assault and summary harassment, but not guilty on aggravated assault — a felony — intimidating a witness and terroristic threats Thursday for an altercation with his ex-girlfriend Natalie Trimble-Warzel on Nov. 9, 2018.

Reed has been in county prison since December 2018 after his bail was revoked for alleged witness intimidation, gaining two felony charges related to that. His pre-trial in that case is scheduled for Dec. 10.

The day after fighting with Trimble-Warzel and making bail with the aid of a bail bondsman, police said he told Thomas Cramm, a witness to the event and who lives with Trimble-Warzel, not to testify.

“If that happens, not only would it be bad for me, but it will be bad for you too,” Reed allegedly told Cramm, who later reported the incident to police.

Both Trimble-Warzel and Cramm testified before the jury concerning the earlier assault charges, but provided vastly different accounts to the incident.

Trimble-Warzel said she arrived late in the night at Reed’s residence, 26 1/2 N. Market St., which he shared with Cramm.

Reed’s continued threats of suicide “sounded serious,” she said. “He was crying and said he was going to jump off a bridge.”

About 5 minutes after Trimble-Warzel’s arrived, she said Reed accused her of sleeping with other men and shoved her.

“The next thing I know I was face down on the couch and he was hitting me on the back of the head,” she said.

While trying to leave, Reed hit her with a chair. This broke her hand and, once escaping, she went to Williamsport Regional Medical Center. With help from an “advocate,” she wrote a statement of the events.

“My whole body was hurting at that time,” she said. Five pins were eventually surgically inserted to help keep her hand in place and she was diagnosed with a concussion.

Cramm, however, said that Trimble-Warzel arrived at his home at around 6:30 p.m. and he , himself, went to sleep around 9 p.m. He awoke to Reed yelling for him to call the police.

The fight, for Cramm, was distinctly one-sided, with Trimble-Warzel hitting Reed.

“(Reed) kept telling her to leave and getting pulverized by her,” said Cramm.

After Reed received a kick to the groin, he became angry and raised a nearby chair.

“It was safe to say he was protecting himself,” he said.

Two policeman also testified to arresting Reed, and agreed that he was intoxicated and subject to wild mood swings.

“He was thrashing, swearing, spitting on walls, and pulled at the cuffs so hard I was worried he would hurt himself,” said one officer. Reed also accused them of having sex with his girlfriend.

Andrea Pulizzi, the defense attorney, emphasized the discrepancy.

“It was the commonwealth’s job to put the puzzle together — they failed,” she said.

Aaron M. Gallogly, assistant district attorney, said Trimble-Warzel’s injuries were consistent with a beating, and questioned using a chair for protection.

“Is that self-defense?” he said. “You hear from the officers how irate he gets.”

Presiding Judge Eric R. Linhardt said he would not reinstate Reed’s bail before sentencing, given the intimidation charges.

A sentencing date will be given once one is available, he said.