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Superintendents expect ‘tough’ budget season

February 10, 2013

The governor’s proposed education budget will help only minimally as the costs of public education continue to sky rocket, according to local school superintendents. Gov....

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654321

Feb-10-13 10:12 PM

Correction - teachers can do everything in their power to try to get students to succeed, but when there is no support at home, it becomes very difficult to reach the success that AYP expects.

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654321

Feb-10-13 10:05 PM

oldbilltown, you are correct. 100% AYP will not be able to become a reality. You cannot change the fact that the teachers can do flips, stand on their heads, etc...to get the kids to succeed. Parental involvement continually declines as the breakdown of the family decreases. ScottOldNewberry is correct!

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USABorn

Feb-10-13 8:26 PM

""We're going to look at every program. We're going to look at every position. We're going to look at every retirement."

But we all know, in the end it will be the students who lose!!!!

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ScottOldNewberry

Feb-10-13 9:57 AM

In my humble opinion, their will never be enough money. People need to understand that you can throw billions education, but until you fix the core problem of lifting regulations that inhibit job creation, and the issue of the broken family, you are always going to be underfunded. Families need to take care of their children and should not expect the schools to provide basic nutrition and baby sitting. Families need to have the means to do this by having access to jobs. You can not have generational EBT then expect these parents to understand how to be self dependant.

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LaughIn

Feb-10-13 9:49 AM

OldBilltown met their AYP! Every year the stakes get higher Carl, and that is why Pa. is transitioning to the Keystones.

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oldbilltown

Feb-10-13 9:25 AM

Note that AYP, "adquate yearly progress" is a moving target that ultimately will be met by no school. AYP requires a higher percentage of kids testing proficient than the previous year. 100% will never happen, and everybody knows that, so eventually all schools will be labeled "failing."

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CarlHiller

Feb-10-13 8:22 AM

The 2011-12 state PSSA results showed declines across the board, and fewer districts and schools making adqequate Progress. School districts and the teachers unions have complained that cyber schools and other charter schools drain money from their budgets, because some of the money follows a child to the new school. This is a criticism simply implying that parents shouldn't be allowed to use public education dollars at a different public school, even if it is best for their children. Moreover, school districts receive 21 deductions for school districts on cyber school payments with more in the works at the legislative level, mainly be Republicans in the house.

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CarlHiller

Feb-10-13 8:06 AM

As is typical of a bureaucrat they only give part of the story. "Grantier said, 'Cyber schools "choke money" away from public schools, especially when they're doing a "poor job at best,". That is simply not the full story, cyber schools do not "choke money" from the public system, since cyber schools cost less to operate it leaves brick and mortar school districts with extra funds. If one of the schools recieves $12000 per pupil and has a thousand pupils in the district and say 100 opt for cyber schooling, the district pays roughly $9500 per student to the cyber school leaving the district with excess funding of $2500 per student now not attending that school. As for the "poor job" likewise this is not the whole story, roughly 25% of cyber students are special needs, allowing the district a savings on theses students as well. While there may be much that can be done to improve cyber schools, they are relatively new, have a great track recor

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